Tennis Champ !

Posted by
Baz Brown
Streets
Countess Street
Time
1950

This is my great grandma Rose Barry 1950 at I believe some tennis courts that were in Countess Street.

Baz Brown · 26 January 2012

Your comment

There were indeed tennis courts in Countess St, on the North West corner and (almost on) the South West corner of Awaba St. They were known as Mitchell’s Tennis Courts, but now long gone for housing.

— David Healy · 27 February 2012, 10:02 · #

I believe the club house for the tennis courts could have been the shed in our backyard at No. 12 Countess Street.

— Lyndel Helm · 26 February 2013, 13:04 · #

And the courts butted up to our back fence at 31 Countess st!!! Right opposite my best friends The Helms at no 12!!! :)
They were grass courts and we always had tennis balls in our yard.

Happy memories

— Cathy Sutton · 30 August 2013, 08:42 · #

Is that Cathy Davis? :-) How are you?

— Lyndel Helm · 23 October 2013, 16:32 · #

The courts butted up to my fence tooooo I must have been number 33 Countess ….opposite Krissy & Lyndel. They were great days back then. I will have to dig up some old photos.

— Jackie Duncan · 23 August 2014, 21:43 · #

We lived next to Mitchells tennis courts at 24 Countess Street, corner of Awaba Street. Mitchells were on the lower corner of Awaba Street, was it Congewoi Road? I played tennis on those courts for many years, we used to play all day school holidays for 3pence each then we’d sweep and mark the courts for Mr Mitchell to save him the next day. Mrs Mitchell would usually also provide us with her special scones. There was a Mosman Lawn Tennis Club in Roseberry Street?? These may have been the ones that backed on the addresses mentioned. The Antcliff twins used to play at Mitchells with me, anybody remember them??

— Rob Stirling · 12 December 2015, 20:24 · #

My grandfather built one of the first houses in Countess St in the early 1920’s. No 8 I think. Family history says he paid the deposit to have the electricity put on to the street. The house was sold in about 1960 or a bit later. He was a Japanese man married to an Australian and they had three daughters. He was interned in WW11 where he died. An interesting history has been complied by Pam Oliver “Raids on Australia” which refers to the strong Japanese community around Mosman in the early 20th century prior to WW11.

— Geoff · 30 July 2016, 20:44 · #